UPCOMING EVENT:

Engage Forum on Gastro-Intestinal Cancer

Have you or a loved one been diagnosed with a Gastro-Intestinal (GI) Cancer? With 28,600 new diagnoses a year, you are not alone.

Hosted by Dr Shalin Naik from ABC TV’s Ask the Doctor, join the GI cancer community online for this free forum to hear from leading health professionals and experienced cancer consumers about the latest advancements in treatments and the hope brought by medical research, including Cancer Australia CEO Dorothy Keefe.

Learn more and register


Welcome

Welcome to the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group (AGITG) and the GI Cancer Institute. We are dedicated to improving treatments and survival rates for people with Gastro-Intestinal (GI) cancer.

Since 1991, we have conducted 59 collaborative multidisciplinary clinical trials giving more than 7,000 people access to new treatments faster. Our dedicated group of researchers – encompassing a wide range of medical specialists, scientists, nurses, allied health professionals and consumers – has grown to over 1,500 and they continue to develop new clinical trial concepts to improve treatments, quality of life and survival for patients. The GI Cancer Institute raises awareness of GI cancer in the community, and raises funds to conduct new GI cancer research

What is GI cancer?

GI cancer is the most common cancer in Australia, directly affecting more than 28,600 Australians each year and claiming a devastating 39 lives each day. GI cancer includes the digestive organs: oesophagus, stomach, liver, gallbladder and biliary tract, pancreas, large and small bowel, rectum and anus.

Survival rates for those diagnosed with GI cancers are lower than for other more well-known cancers: there is a just 51% chance of surviving 5 years.

Learn more about GI cancers

Our research

Our research and clinical trials are not about laboratories and test tubes – they are about real people fighting disease and getting access to the most effective treatments. Clinical trials offer many benefits for patients including providing immediate access to the latest treatments, improving survival odds and improving quality of life during treatment.

Clinical trials are necessary to find out if new treatments are more effective than those currently accepted as the best available standard therapy. Trials are also essential for new, improved treatments to be adopted, as all treatments and procedures must be scientifically proven before they can be made widely accessible.

Conducting clinical trials in Australia means patients are able to access new treatments three to five years earlier than if they were conducted overseas.

View our open clinical trials

How you can help

One of our greatest challenges is a lack of funding. Community support is vital in funding our research and continuing clinical trials, now and into the future. To show your support you can make a donation, become a regular giver, take on a Gutsy Challenge trek, hold a community fundraiser and much more.

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