AG9401

A randomised trial of early chemotherapy in asymptomatic metastatic colorectal cancer.

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Trial Status

Completed

Cancer Type

Colorectal Cancer

Aim

People with advanced colon cancer sometimes feel completely well when they are first diagnosed. This study asks the question, “Is it better to start chemotherapy immediately – causing serious side-effects – or delay until symptoms appear?” The results of this study demonstrated that delaying chemotherapy was as safe as giving treatment straightaway and allowed better quality of life in the meantime.

Trial Status

Completed

Cancer Type

Colorectal Cancer

Publication Reference

Ackland SP, Jones M, Tu D, Simes J, Yuen J, Sargeant A-M, Dhillon H, Goldberg RM, Abdi E, Shepherd L, Moore MJ. A meta-analysis of two randomised trials of early chemotherapy in asymptomatic metastatic colorectal cancer. British Journal of Cancer 2005; 93: 1235–1243.

Conference Presentation Reference

Ackland S, Moore M, Jones M, Tu D, Simes R, Yuen J, Sargeant A, Dhillon H, Goldberg R, Abdi E, Shepherd L A. Meta-analysis of two randomised trials of early chemotherapy in asymptomatic metastatic colorectal cancer. American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting; 12–15 May 2001; San Francisco.

Aim

People with advanced colon cancer sometimes feel completely well when they are first diagnosed. This study asks the question, “Is it better to start chemotherapy immediately – causing serious side-effects – or delay until symptoms appear?” The results of this study demonstrated that delaying chemotherapy was as safe as giving treatment straightaway and allowed better quality of life in the meantime.

Principal Investigator

Professor Stephen Ackland, Medical Oncologist, Newcastle Calvary Mater Hospital NSW

Funding

Pharmacia (Pty) Limited (Australia)