First Nations peoples and GI cancer clinical trials

Madison Shakespeare shares insight on why inclusion of First Nations peoples in cancer clinical trials is essential, as well as ways we can extend greater access in pursuit of it.

About Madison Shakespeare

Madison Shakespeare was previously a member of the GI Cancer Institute’s Community Advisory Panel. When the love of Madison’s life was diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma, she saw the opportunity to join the CAP as a way to fulfil her passion for finding solutions for early detection, diverse treatment options, and quality and end of life choices to ensure that all are able to realise self-determination.

As an Aboriginal Australian, she is also a large advocate for addressing the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, working in research that is focused on addressing disparities caused by social determinants of Indigenous health.

About Julie McCrossin AM

Julie McCrossin gets people talking. After 20 years as a presenter with ABC Radio National, ABC TV and Network Ten, she is now a freelance broadcaster, podcaster and MC.

Julie was treated for stage four, HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer (tonsils, tongue and throat) in 2013. Julie is an Ambassador for Targeting Cancer and TROG Cancer Research. She is a member of the advocacy group, Cancer Voices SA. Julie hosts the podcast series, The Thing About Cancer and The Thing About Advanced Cancer for Cancer Council NSW.

In 2019, Julie was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia for significant service to the community, particularly through LGBTIQ advocacy roles and to the broadcast media.

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